Monday, February 04, 2008

Kate's Lost Theory

I'm still working on this theory but wanted to jot down a few notes before I forget them. My apologies to those of you who were looking for another real estate post (which I will return to shortly).

The central premise of “Lost” is transcending birth and extinction. As, apparently, only Richard Alpert has been able to accomplish. Recall that Richard does not appear to age and Ben asks Richard if Richard even remembers what birthdays are. Further, Richard tells Locke that Ben is wasting his time with the fertility research. Also, the dead are frequently seen on the island (e.g. Christian Sheppard).

Ben's last name is Linus and Linus is the son of Apollo. When Hera discovered that Leto was pregnant with Apollo, she banned Leto from giving birth on "terra firma", or the mainland, or any island. In her wanderings, Leto found the newly created floating island of Delos, which was neither mainland nor a real island, and she gave birth there. The island was surrounded by swans. Afterwards, Zeus secured Delos to the bottom of the ocean. This island later became sacred to Apollo.


On the philosopher, John Locke: "Locke posits an “empty” mind—a tabula rasa—that is shaped by experience; sensations and reflection being the two sources of all our ideas. See also social contract theory. Social contract theory provides the rationale behind the historically important notion that legitimate state authority must be derived from the consent of the governed.

Richard Alpert is based on the actual Richard Alpert (a/k/a Baba Ram Dass) author of “Be Here Now.” Somewhat confirmed by Damon & Carlton in podcast.

“Be Here Now” continues to be an influential spiritual catalyst, and has inspired many to follow their own path with renewed faith and passion.

Ram Dass was also active in the Seva Foundation an organization devoted to restoring vision through affordable eye surgeries (see Lostpedia for eye symbolism).

The Dharma Initiative is based on the Lama Foundation. The DeGroots (who founded Dharma) are based on Barbara and Steven Durkee.

Locke is a tribute to Lawrence Ferlinghetti, founder of City Lights Bookstore and publisher of Ram Dass’s “Be Here Now.” Note that as commander of the subchaser USS SC1308, Ferlinghetti was at the Normandy invasion as part of the anti-submarine screen around the beaches. Two weeks after the atomic bomb fell on Nagasaki, he visited the ruins of the city, an experience that turned Ferlinghetti into a life-long pacifist." It’s not a mere coincidence that Locke blew up the submarine on the island, his gun is never loaded, and he can’t bring himself to kill anybody.

The ship Black Rock appears to be named after the Black Rock Desert, home of the Burning Man Festival. “The Black Rock Desert region has vast areas of land where travelers who experience a breakdown might not be found by others. The ease with which a visitor can drive onto the playa allows newcomers to take risks that they may not realize.”

The wild boars on the island may be a tribute to the Hog Farm commune and Wavy Gravy's
pig, “Nobody.”

Walt may be based on Charles Manson, member of The Family, founder of Spahn Ranch, who professed to have powers to stop watches with his mind. The Family was a notorious cult that engaged in child abductions and recruitment by use of sexuality.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

"Walt may be based on Charles Manson, member of The Family, founder of Spahn Ranch, who professed to have powers to stop watches with his mind. The Family was a notorious cult that engaged in child abductions and recruitment by use of sexuality."

You are confusing the Children of God Family with the Manson Family. Charles Manson was the head of the Manson Family who lived on Spahn Ranch.

The cult headed by David Berg was known as "The Family." It is now called "The Children of God." Berg's Family is the one that practiced "flirty fishing", using young girls to lure converts to the cult.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_International

Kate said...

You're right. I am blurring the two "families" but I think they both may tie into the 'Lost' scheme.

Cecil X. Nixxon said...

Bravo and thanx! This theory certailnly explains the presence of the iconic VW Microbus, and the abundant telepathic/transcendental themes.